What We Do

Activities

Activities are an integral part of Scouting, and what makes it so exciting for the young people involved.

Scouting as a whole undertakes activities from abseiling to canoeing; gang shows to mountain biking; orienteering to sailing – and so on! for a list of activities Scouts can do, please see the Activities A-Z on the UK Scout Association’s website.

Balanced Programme

Providing our Scouts with a programme that is both balanced and exciting is one of the most rewarding challenges for our leaders.

What we offer to young people is a range of activities, events and experiences built around a number of programme zones. We balance the programme in the same way you’d balance a diet, by simply ensuring that over a given period (a month or a term, for example), there is something from each zone in the Programme.

Youlbury Photoshoot - April 2010

Young people experience Scouting by regularly taking part in quality activities, drawn from each programme zone. Personal achievement can be recognised by earning awards and badges leading to the Chief Scout’s Awards and the Queen’s Scout Award.

Scouting in the community

Scouting has a positive impact on communities across the UK. Strong values and making a positive contribution to society have always underpinned our movement.

iSCOUT photoshoot

You are now likely to find us planting trees, leading recycling schemes and helping older people use the internet. As a movement, Scouting is not afraid to change and while our values remain constant, what we do must evolve to meet the needs of today’s society.

But exactly how much does Scouting contribute?

  • Some 88% of our young people said scouting has helped them develop key skills
  • 97% reckoned Scouting helped them make friends and build relationships with other people.
  • More than 90% of Scouting’s volunteers say it has helped them develop personal and practical skills.
  • 36% of former members volunteer regularly (as least two hours per week) set against only 26% of the general population.

‘Helping in the community makes me feel I have achieved something,’ says Amy, a 14-year-old explorer Scout. ‘We did a sleep out to raise money on World Homeless Day. I met homeless people and saw for myself the problems they face.’

So the next time you see a Scout in the street, look beyond the woggle and neckerchief – you’re looking at a citizen of the future and one of tomorrow’s leaders today. Better still, offer to give a little time yourself.